Approximate Jewish Partisan activity marked in yellow.
Lithuania

There were 850 Jews in the Lithuanian partisan movement. An additional 450 Lithuanian fighters in the Belorussian partisan movement and another 350 Lithuanian Jews in other groups brought the total to 1,650 Lithuanian Jews who fought as partisans. Of the 92 partisan battalions, Jews fought in the 22 that had sterling records in battle. Survival in the forest was extremely difficult in Lithuania, due to pervasive antisemitism in many areas of the country. Lithuanian, Polish and Belorussian civilians killed many Jewish partisans. Non-Jewish partisans were also a threat to the Jews.

In 1943, Lithuanian Jewish partisans became unified under the direction of Soviet Lithuanian partisan movement. Admission of Jews to the partisans was limited for political and military reasons as well as because of antisemitism. Even in some of the mixed units Jews experienced discrimination. Yet the partisan movement was their only vehicle to actively fight against the Nazis. In some cases, all-Jewish units were formed within the larger organization of Lithuanian partisans.

Among their many successful missions, Lithuanian Jewish partisans derailed enemy trains, dynamited miles of train tracks, destroyed bridges, factories, water towers and electrical transformers, and cut hundreds of miles of telephone and telegraph lines. In Vilna, they damaged the power station and sabotaged the water supplies. Other times they secured arms and food supplies.

Ten percent of the Lithuanian partisan population was comprised of Jewish partisans, but the Jews were responsible for 79% of the train derailments, 72% of the locomotives destroyed, 22.9 % of the soldiers killed Sabotage was only one their specialties. In total, 1, 650 Jews took part in the resistance movement in Lithuanian partisan movement. A total of 250 Jews were killed, and many received medals for their prominent service.

Find out who the partisans were and how they fought the Nazis. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Not a study guide at all, but a document for communities wanting to acknowledge the intenet of Holoucast Rememberacne Day as it was started in Israel, in 1951. Includes a brief history and reading.

Learn how the partisans fought hunger and survived the harsh winter cold. How did they survive? Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Learn how a determined Ben helped initially free 600 Jews from a Nazi work camp. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Find out how a woman partisan earns one of the Soviet Unions highest honors. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Meet Frank, a determined fighter who escaped the ghettos and valiantly fought against his oppressors. Go to the Films section to view the film that compliments this study guide.

Many Jews suffered from antisemtism in the partisans, even though they were fighting a common enemy. Read this study guide to learn about the role antisemitism played in and out of the partisan units and how it differed from region to region.